American Madness

Intelligent Criticism in the Service of a Better Nation




Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia

Posted by Matt Cipriano | 3 Comments

At least that is what H.G. Wells thought, too bad he was a little off.

With a nice long warm weekend coming up, what better to do then break out your bike and go for a ride.

Not sure where to go, well then you should visit RideTheCity. RideTheCity is a website similar to MapQuest or HopStop, enter your location and your destination and it will draw up a route for you, you can even pick if you’d rather take the ‘Safest Route,’ the ‘Safe Route’ or the “Most Direct Route.” There are two main reason syou are going to want to use RideTheCity instead of, say, Google Maps “First, RTC excludes roads that aren’t meant for biking, like the BQE and the Queens Midtown tunnel. Second, RTC tries to locate routes that maximize the use of bike lanes and greenways.”

Pretty nifty, especially if you have ever ridden your bike in traffic.

Right now it is only for New York City, plus you need to cut them some slack because they are still in their Beta Release, so go, check it out, show them some love and enjoy your nice long weekend.

Comments

3 Responses to “Cycle tracks will abound in Utopia”

  1. Josh Friedlander
    July 7th, 2008 @

    Can the site recommend a bike? I can’t believe how much money the major bike makers are now charging for basic road bikes.

  2. Matt Cipriano
    July 8th, 2008 @

    Right now they only appear to be the maps, though they do have a blog, they might be able to make you a bike recommendation from there.

  3. Joel Friedlander
    July 12th, 2008 @

    I have been looking all over at the prices of bicycles. Williams Bicycles in Hicksville for example is selling a 2008 Schwinn road/touring/city bike for $569, but its components are nowhere near as good as the Specialized bikes that are selling for about $125 more. The Schwinn bikes for about $700-800 are also leagues better. The cheaper bikes are the ones without drop handle bars. I think that the difference is worth the money because you are riding the bike and its your life.

    Jamis and Bianchi also make terrific bikes for about $750-800. That appears to be the new price for a reasonably good bike with good components. I urge all of you to consider investing in a mode of transportation which provides fresh air, exercise, and saves money as well.

    With the changes that will be rapidly taking place in the city so far as bike lanes are concerned, it is the wave of the future.

    Also, there are terrific large bicycle panniers for carrying things, such as books, laundry, groceries, meat products, etc. These can be put on the bike and taken off without ado at the destination and carried by handles or over the shoulder. Many companies make them. I just got a pair from a company called detours. Wonderful stuff. You can take it with you wherever you go as a carryall.

    People also band in groups and go for rides on the North Fork of Long Island to visit the wineries or the farms, or just to go sight seeing, or eating at the fine restaurants out there. It is easy to put the bikes on the train or just put them on an auto rack. Its a great way to spend a Summer or Autumn day. Recently, you can ride well into December or even January before you need really warm clothing.

    In NYC, a martini costs $15 or so and it is gone in half an hour; it goes with a dinner that costs $50-100.00. So what’s a bicycle that costs $800 if it can last for years. I have a Cannondale that is 21 years old and since it was refurbished with a tuneup, new tires and wires, and the wheels trued, it rides just like new. If I lived in Manhattan above 65th street, or way downtown I would use it regularly for all trips and for exercise as well. No one mentions it, but you can also reduce your gym time with a bicycle, while doing errands and shopping.

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